The Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellowships

The Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellowship seeks to attract talented, committed individuals with backgrounds in the STEM fields—science, technology, engineering, and mathematics—into teaching in high-need secondary schools in Georgia,Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and New Jersey. Eligible applicants include current undergraduates, recent college graduates, mid-career professionals, and retirees who have majored in, or had careers in, STEM fields.

 

 

The Fellowship also works to change the way top teachers are prepared, partnering with colleges and universities that have agreed to provide Fellows with innovative, year-long classroom experiences, rigorous academic work, and ongoing mentoring.

The Teaching Fellowship includes:

  • admission to a master’s degree program at a partner university
  • preparation for teacher certification in science, mathematics or technology education
  • extensive preparation for teaching in a high-need urban or rural secondary school for one full year prior to becoming the teacher-of-record in a science or math classroom
  • a $30,000 stipend, with tuition arrangements varying by campus in Georgia, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and New Jersey. (Once Fellows are certified teachers at the end of the first year, they obtain salaried employment in high-need schools.)
  • support and mentoring throughout the three-year teaching commitment
  • support of a cohort of WW Fellows passionate about science and math education
  • lifelong membership in a national network of Woodrow Wilson Fellows who are intellectual leaders

There are two upcoming application deadlines – November 14, 2014 and January 31, 2015 (the final deadline).  For more information and to apply, please go to The Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellowship website.

NYC Teaching Fellows Program

The New York City Teaching Fellows program is preparing a critical mass of exceptional teachers committed to a better future for the NYC students who need them most.  Fellows complete a master’s degree that is subsidized by the NYC Department of Education while teaching full-time in a public school, allowing for a direct transition into the classroom.

Since 2000, the Fellows program has provided New York City students with thousands of talented new teachers. Today, Fellows work in 80 percent of New York City’s 1,800 public schools and represent 12 percent of the city’s active teaching force.

The priority application deadline is November 6th, 2014.

Here’s How to Get Started:

  1. Visit the NYC TF website to see if you are eligible to apply.
  2. Visit the FAQ page to learn about the program and the Fellowship experience.
  3. Review the application process and learn about the materials you’ll need to gather.

Attend an Event: If you would like to attend an online information session to receive more information about the NYC TF program, please register here. The next online information session will be on Thursday, October 30th from 6pm-7pm EST.

Alumni Spotlight – Christopher Pedigo (PRISM ’09) Earns American Heart Association Fellowship and Other Accolades

Christopher Pedigo, a PRISM alumnus who graduated in 2009, is steadily pursuing his goal of starting his own biomedical research lab.  With just one more year to go in pursuit of his PhD in Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology at the Miller College of Medicine in the University of Miami, Christopher has already published several scholarly articles and received accolades for his work.

Pedigo Blog 1While at John Jay, he worked under the mentorship of Dr. Yi He on a project published in the January 2013 issue of the Journal of Environmental Science and Health, titled “Bioaccessibility of arsenic in various types of rice in an in vitro gastrointestinal fluid system.”  After he graduated, Christopher spent two years as an adjunct instructor at John Jay and Borough of Manhattan Community College, while continuing to perform research in the labs of both Dr. He and Dr. Nathan Lents.

In 2009, Christopher was accepted into his PhD program and started research with his PI, Dr. Sandra Merscher, and co-mentor, Dr. Alessia Fornoni.  Their work investigates novel causes of Diabetic Kidney Disease (DKD), which affects 40% of diabetic patients, as potential therapeutic targets.  Consequently, Christopher and his lab are looking at the role of circulating factors on the glomerulus in vivo in mouse models and in vitro in the podocyte.

He is co-first author on the publication, “Sphingomyelinase-like phosphodiesterase 3b expression levels determine podocyte injury phenotypes in glomerular disease,” published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. In this study, Christopher and his colleagues show that SMPDL3b levels are differently regulated in two glomerular diseases and that these levels determine the type of damage caused by certain circulating factors (more specifically sUPAR).

Christopher earned an American Heart Association Fellowship to help him continue his research and eagerly awaits word on his pre-doctoral NIH F31 fellowship application.  Travel grants awarded to Christopher are allowing him to visit various U.S. locales in order to advance his research and develop his expertise. Christopher is one of five PhD students nationally to receive the Tutored Research and Education for Kidney Scholars grant that will afford Christopher the opportunity to take a week-long kidney physiology class in Maine.  Other travel grants also allow him to attend the Kern Lipid Conference this summer in Vail, Colorado and to attend the American Society of Nephrology Conference in Philadelphia this fall.

PRISM is very proud of Christopher’s accomplishments since graduating John Jay and wishes him the best of luck in all of his academic endeavors.